The Cutting Edge

The official blog of Knife Depot

Best Everyday Carry Eating Tools

Preparation is the key to survival.

Imagine this scenario: You’re lost out in the wilderness for days surviving on berries and wildflowers when all of a sudden you come across a fresh and perfectly made banana split. But all you have are your hands to eat the delicious and potentially life-saving ice cream creation, so you pass it along and succumb to starvation hours later.

If only you had a tool for eating something on the go.

Sure, this tale is grossly exaggerated (and you would just use your hands to eat and deal with the mess after), but it also serves as a cautionary story about the need to be prepared for everything and that includes eating like a civilized being.

Fortunately for those of us who like to eat on the go without getting our hands dirty, manufacturers make a range of tools designed to serve as utensils in any situation. Here are some of the best.

CRKT Eat’N Tool

Let’s start off with one of the most famous eating tools: the CRKT Eat’N Tool. This little guy has become one of the gold standards for what a simple yet effective eating tool should be. Designed by Liong Mah (of CRKT Remedy fame), the Eat’N Tool has a spork setup with some extras like a bottle opener, screwdrivers, pry bar, and metric wrenches.

Thanks to the cutout in the middle, the tool is surprisingly comfortable to use. It weighs 1.5 ounces and is meant to attach to your keychains for those times you’re stuck without a spoon. If you want a longer one, you can grab the CRKT Eat’N Tool XL.

KA-BAR Tactical Spork

So the name is a little silly, but the concept of the KA-BAR Tactical Spork is great. This is a compact eating utensil made from black Grilamid and looks like a classic spork when closed. But when you need a knife, it splits into two for a knife and fork set.

This tool is made in the United States and has an overall length of nearly 7 inches. This is a good camping set or something you can easily stick in your bag or EDC kit.

Kershaw Ration

The Kershaw Ration shies away from the spork, which does have some limitations and makes a tool with a fork and a spoon (as well as a cap lifter). The stainless steel tool is compact and weighs 1.1 ounces. It also has a cool carabiner to easily attach to a backpack or lunch bag for when you need it.

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Partial Repeal of Illinois Switchblade Ban Signed into Law

Last week, the repeal of the Colorado switchblade ban finally took effect (but beware since the state does not have a statewide preemption law).  Then, on Friday, the governor of Illinois signed SB607 into law, making it legal for millions of Illinoisans to carry switchblades.

The law takes effect immediately and allows legal possession of automatic knives by anyone in the state who has a Firearm Owner’s Identification (FOID) Card. The card allows people to buy firearms and ammunition.

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Condor TK Bushlore – Badass Knife of the Week

Bushcrafting doesn’t just involve surviving out in the elements but thriving by using nature’s resources to prosper. Some knives will just get you through an ordeal but other knives like our latest Badass Knife of the Week will allow you to flourish in even the most dismal circumstances.

The Condor Tool & Knife Bushlore is a sturdy fixed blade with a classic look that’s designed to tackle all your bushcrafting needs, whether it’s setting up a shelter, hunting for your dinner, or making necessary crafts from wood.

Boasting a 4.31-inch blade with a full tang, the knife excels at all toughest tasks without breaking under pressure. The 1075 high carbon steel takes an edge without much effort and holds it well, a virtue in any bushcrafting knife steel.

What gives the Condor Bushlore its handsome look is the walnut handle scales that enframe the full tang. Brass pins hold the handles together as a lanyard hole near the butt offers another method for carrying.

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Top 15 Left-Handed EDC Knives

Only about 10 percent of people are left-handed.

That means the vast majority of items and tools are made with right-handers in mind. Lefties have to put up with right-handed scissors, right-handed can openers, right-handed desks, etc. While the left-handed industry has grown over the years (they make left-handed everything nowadays like scissors and reverse spiral-bound notebooks), finding the same quality that right-handers are afforded is hard.

But it is not hopeless for left-handers. Right, Ned?

Fortunately, for all you lefties out there, some knifemakers are sensitive to your plight and have created truly ambidextrous knife designs. If you’re tired trying to adjusts to right-handed knives with their annoying liner locks, these 10 knives are great EDC options for left-handers.

1. Gerber Gator

Gerber gets much maligned by knife experts for a number of reasons, including some that are well-deserved, but when they do something right, they do it really right. The Gerber Gator is the perfect example. This knife is a staple of the Gerber line and is made in the United States with quality materials.

The clip point blade is 420HC stainless steel and the textured handle is glass-filled nylon. You can grab the drop point in 154CM steel if your heart desires. But the real left-handed feature on the knife is the lock back mechanism (which is more specifically a mid lock). This mechanism can be used effectively with either hand.

There’s also no thumb studs or nail nicks on either side which means you can open it up by pinching the blade with either hand. Finally, a lack of clip won’t give you anxiety about which direction it should face.

2. Benchmade Griptilian

If you want a truly ambidextrous knife, look no further than Benchmade. Essentially every knife in the lineup works seamlessly with the left hand thanks to the AXIS locking mechanism.

Here is the great Doug Ritter singing the AXIS lock’s praises on his site:

Operationally, the lock can be, and is in all the knives produced so far, completely ambidextrous since the locking bar extends through both side plates. While the lockback is also ambidextrous, the liner lock is not, and with few exceptions, southpaws have been left out in the cold when it comes to liner lock knives.

Because pretty much all Benchmade knives could be on this list, I narrowed it down to the two that are among the best EDC knives ever. The first to make the appearance is the Benchmade Griptilian.

There’s something about the design of the knife that makes it so darn functional and appealing. The originals featured an exceptionally grippy nylon handle with a 154CM blade. For those of us in regions with restrictions, the Mini Griptilian has a blade that comes in at less than 3 inches.

Then, of course, there’s the recently upgraded premium version of the knife with G10 handle scales, blue anodized titanium spacers, and premium CPM-20CV steel. Plus, the knife comes in all types of colors and black or satin blade coating.

There’s a Griptilian for every personality.

3. Al Mar Ultralight Eagle

Al Mar is a legend in the knife community and the brand’s bird of prey line (Eagle, Falcon, and Hawk) are among the best EDC knives around. They’re a bit on the pricey end, but the Ultralight versions weighing in at less than 3 ounces are worth the price.

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Flippy Knife App Makes a Game Out of Knife Throwing

Too few knife apps exist.

There’s the must-have blade steel reference app from zknives descriptively called Knife Steel Composition Chart App. There’s the always useful but clunky LegalBlade App from Knife Rights. For a brief but wondrous period, there was the curious KA-BAR app that let you generate your knife name.

Now, there’s a new knife game all you blade fanatics might enjoy: Flippy Knife.

Flippy Knife (Apple/Android) is a physics-based knife game that simulates throwing a knife. There are four different modes: an arcade mode, a throwing knife mode, a vertical ascent mode, and a standard flipping mode.

App reviewers have been comparing the game to the new water bottle flipping fad, but all of us knife enthusiasts know that this is more based on mumblety-peg — the very old knife flipping game dating back hundreds of years.

What’s so special about this game is that the maker contacted several knifemakers and brands to bring actual knives to the game, including the G&G Hawk Deadlock, Brian Tighe Fighter, and BucknBear Velociraptor.

I downloaded the app and played for a bit. It is insanely addictive but equally frustrating.

The modes offer enough variation to not get too tired after a few minutes. I found it extremely difficult to get the technique just right and I noticed the knife did not stick when it was supposed to a few times. I’ve probably just lost my video game touch.

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Kershaw Chill – Badass Knife of the Week

For those days when you just want to chill, our latest Badass Knife of the Week has you covered.

The Kershaw Chill is a slim, affordable folder that’s happy to be your EDC when you feel like lounging around or taking it easy.

Measuring 3.1 inches, the blade features a narrow, drop point design that excels at both slicing and piercing. The bead-blasted 8Cr13MoV stainless steel is functional, resistant to corrosion, and resharpens without much effort.

The knife comes to life quickly and efficiently thanks to its silky smooth flipper manual opening action. Without thumb studs adorning the blade, the profile of the knife remains thin and inconspicuous.

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Top 20 Worst Knife Names Ever

They say a rose by any other name would smell as sweet… but if they were called stenchblossoms or crapweeds, I imagine they would be a bit less appealing.

The same thing goes for a knife. The almost universally acclaimed Ontario RAT Model 1 would still perform just as well if it were called the Ontario Elephant Earwax 7, but it might not be quite as popular.

While I acknowledge naming something is extremely difficult (I considered naming my son Humphrey), it can really kill the whole vibe of a knife. So I scoured the Internet and my memory bank to come up with a list of the worst knife names around. Many of these knives are well-made and perfectly usable but simply have a name that is off-putting.

This is my personal preference, so take that as you will. If you have any to add, let me know in the comments.

Note: I excluded custom knifemakers because they have a little more creative leeway. I also tried to exclude knives with people’s names. For example, I dislike all the Brian Tighe-related pun names (Tighe Rade, My Tighe, Tighe Coon, etc), but it’s the guy’s name so I let them be.

Finally, the LA Police Gear “The Best F***ing Knife” S35VN Every Day Carry Folding Knife (yes, that’s the full name) was considered for this list but I couldn’t figure out whether the overly descriptive and braggadocios name was so over the top it was the best name ever or the worst. I decided to leave it off for now.

20. Kershaw Wild Wild Turkey

Let’s start with one that’s a bit innocuous: the Kershaw Wild Wild Turkey. This now discontinued knife was actually a well-made and sleek gentleman’s folder. The steel was ATS 34 with titanium handles (if I’m correct). The name Wild Turkey is already a bit silly but the addition of another Wild takes things to another level.

I think Kershaw learned its lesson because future iterations of the knife were simply named Wild Turkey. Still, despite the name, this knife is still sought after by aficionados.

19. TOPS Felony Stop

Next we have the first of many TOPS Knives with the Felony Stop. Knives already get a bad rap because of their misuse by a few individuals and you don’t want to call attention to that fact. The name Felony Stop is a bit confusing anyway. Is it supposed to be an instruction to stop a felony or is the knife itself a felony stop? Either way, the knife wouldn’t be so bad if it didn’t say FELONY in big bold letters right on the knife.

The knife, designed by the great Laci Szabo, is said to be only intended for law enforcement personnel and specialists, so take that as you will.

18. CRKT Hootenanny

Hootenanny is an Appalachian colloquialism that originally started off as a Scottish word meaning party or celebration. It has since evolved to mean thingamajig or whatchamacallit or doohickey. So when you say pass me that “Hootenanny,” it just sounds funny.

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Knives Save Lives: Agitated Boa Constrictor vs. Pocket Knife

“I have a boa constrictor stuck to my face.”

That was what one Ohio woman shouted frantically to a 911 operator last week after a massive 5 1/2 foot boa constrictor she had rescued managed to wrap itself around her neck and bite her nose.

You can hear the panic and fear in her voice as she called emergency services to get help. Listen to the full audio right here:

The 45-year-old woman from Sheffield Lake apparently rescues snakes and had rescued this boa constrictor along with another one the day before. She has 11 snakes total, according to the 911 recording.

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CRKT RSK Mk 5 – Badass Knife of the Week

These days, Doug Ritter is best known for founding Knife Rights and fighting for the rights of knife enthusiasts around the country. But, as our latest Badass Knife of the Week reminds us, Ritter isn’t just some guy in a suit; he’s a survival expert that knows a thing or two about what to look for in a good knife.

When you think of the typical survival knife, you probably envision a massive fixed blade with sawback serrations and a hollow handle to conceal a few basic things. The CRKT RSK Mk 5 skips all the fads of modern survival knives and fits everything you need in a compact design that weighs less than an ounce.

Standing for the Ritter Survival Knife, the RSK Mk 5 has an overall length of 3.81 inches with a 1.75-inch blade and skeletonized handle made from stonewashed 2Cr13 steel.

If you think a knife this small can’t help in a survival situation, think again.

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Benchmade Introduces a New Knife Called The Bugout

The Benchmade line of knives has remained relatively consistent over the past few years. The typical knife has a tactical design with the AXIS lock that’s built for hard use.

However, a few months back, the Butterfly brand introduced the company’s first slip joint knife called the Proper. This gentleman’s folder does not have a locking mechanism whatsoever (let alone the AXIS lock) and is designed for lighter use.

This week, Benchmade continued its introduction of new knives with a different target audience with The Bugout.

According to the Benchmade marketing literature, the knife is under two ounces and boasts more than 200 uses. This lightweight knife is aimed at backpackers or those looking for a knife to stick in their bugout bag (hence the name).

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